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The Four Archetypes of Happiness

By Sara Fabian on Wednesday April 26th, 2017

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Which One Are You?

When you dance, your purpose is not to get to a certain place on the floor. It’s to enjoy each step along the way. ~ Wayne Dyer

One day, I was complaining about not having enough time off to escape work and treat myself to a vacation. I was feeling stressed and tired. I can recall my stepfather looking into my eyes with a deep sense of peace and compassion.

“I hear you,” he said. “I know you work hard. Sometimes, I imagine myself jumping out of bed and going for a walk, whenever I want to.”

His words came like thunder. It was a wake-up call to remind me how blessed I was and how much I was taking it for granted, as if nothing was ever enough. And there he was, my stepfather, trapped in a wheelchair by a severe form of multiple sclerosis, dreaming of a nice walk in nature. That day, he was my teacher.

For too many years, I spent a lot of my precious time complaining. I thought I never had enough time, money, or love.

Many of us get stuck in the habit of projecting our happiness into an imaginary future instead of living in the only reality that is, the present moment. We often think thoughts like:

The day I get married, I will be happy.

The day I can afford a bigger house, I will be happy.

The day I make X amount of money, I will be happy.

Happiness is a choiceIt’s easy to fall into dissatisfaction, no matter how good or bad our lives are.

Looking back on my life, I came to realize that I didn’t know how to be happy. I continuously kept myself busy, always running somewhere so I could achieve more or be better. Turning my happiness into a project and waiting for ‘the big things’ to happen so I could finally feel joyful and satisfied.

I didn’t know it at the time, but I was a rat-racer. Here’s what I mean by that:

In his book Happier, Tal Ben-Shahar (a Harvard professor, leading researcher, and author) defines four different happiness archetypes:

Nihilism

Nihilists have lost their joy in life; both present and future. They find no pleasure in their work or private life and expect no future benefits or rewards. They’ve given up and resigned to their fate.

Hedonism

Hedonists live for the moment and give little or no thought to future consequences and plans. Because they feel unchallenged by future goals or a purpose, they are often unfulfilled.

Rat-Racing

The rat-race archetype often sacrifices current pleasures and benefits in anticipation of some future rewards. This is likely the most familiar archetype to many of us (continuously setting new goals, never pleased, always busy).

Rat-raceWhen we’re in the ‘rat-race’ we forget to enjoy the everyday moments of life.

It doesn’t mean that setting clear goals for the future is a bad practice. We all need a purpose and a clear vision. If we don’t even know what we want, how could we ever get that? The problem occurs when we attach our happiness to future outcomes without being able to see and appreciate what’s already good in our lives.

Rat-racing is all about hunting for happiness, chasing an illusion, and never feeling content. The more we achieve, the more we want: another house, another car, another job, or more money.

Happiness

True happiness comes from keeping a healthy balance between the present and the future. It’s when we are capable of enjoying both the journey and the destination, focusing on today’s gifts, as well as our dreams, goals, and desires.

Happiness is not about making it to the peak of the mountain nor is it about climbing aimlessly around the mountain; happiness is the experience of climbing toward the peak. ~Tal Ben-Shahar

The day I shifted my perception from stressed to blessed, everything changed. Here’s what I have learned and what worked well for me:

1. Happiness is a Verb

Research has shown that happiness is 50 percent connected to our genes; only 10 percent attributed to life circumstances, and 40 percent correlated with our thoughts and behaviors. That’s why happiness is not a noun; it’s a verb. For those of us who are mentally healthy, it’s an attitude, a continuous inside job.

Many people are afraid to be happy, since they could lose it one day, and they let their worries ruin their joy.

Choose happinessHappiness is 40% correlated with our thoughts and behaviors and only 10% with our circumstances.

I cultivate optimism and trust the flow of life. I shift my focus from what could go wrong to what could go right. Whatever I fear – it hasn’t happened yet. I embrace my future with the genuine curiosity of a child, and I choose to believe that something wonderful is waiting around the corner — that we live in a supportive Universe where everything unfolds perfectly, and things happen for my highest good.

If I see life with negativity, fearing that bad things could happen to me, my actions will likely attract the very things I’m trying to avoid. I’ve stopped letting my mind play with me and stress me with unnecessary fears, worries, and concerns about things that haven’t happen yet.

I nourish my mind with healthy thoughts, like this one:

Life loves me. All is well in my world, and I am safe. ~ Louise Hay

2. Sweeten Your Life, Every Day

I have seen that many beautiful moments and small pleasures come at a low cost or even for free.

If I don’t have time for my hobbies, I make it. I read a good book or watch a fun movie that brings me joy and laughter.

I gather with non-judgmental people who love me just the way I am. The mere act of having a good conversation over a cup of coffee charges me with a high dose of positive energy.

I go for nice walks in the park and connect with nature.

I play with my dog.

Appreciate the sweetnessAdd sweetness to your life, with nature, pets, friends, fun activities and so on.

I sometimes light a candle or some nice smelling incense. (Jasmine is my favorite.) This stimulates my creativity and makes me feel good.

I’ve stopped waiting for the VIP moments of the year (like my birthday) to embellish my house with fresh flowers.

I have created the habit of drinking water from a wine glass with a slice of lemon in it.

I enjoy my morning coffee from a beautiful cup with a red heart on it, to remind myself that love is all around.

I use the beautiful bed sheets and the nice towels instead of saving them for the guests, just because I’m worth it.

Yesterday is history; tomorrow is a mystery. Today is a gift; that’s why we call it the present. ~ Unknown

3. Grow Dreams, Not Regrets

The need for stability and security (including on a financial level) is a basic human need. No wonder we start rat-racing if we don’t have enough money! But what is ‘enough’? Isn’t that a subjective qualifier, based on our individual needs and expectations?

I have met many wealthy people who were unhappy because their ego always wanted to have more or be better. It’s like when we think, “Okay, I’ve got this house now, but when I can move my family into a bigger one, I will finally be happy.”

Happiness comes from withinOur conditioning means that we are always looking for MORE in order to find happiness.

Another reason we project happiness into the future pertains to limiting (often culturally inherited) beliefs around money that keep us stuck in a survival mode.

Take my example: Years ago, I used to work in China. I lived in a beautiful compound in downtown Shanghai, all paid for by my company, and I was single, with no loans, debt, or financial commitments. It all looked wonderful, but deep inside, I was so unhappy!

I knew I always wanted to travel the world and meet people from different cultures. I had enough money to afford that, and still, I was so afraid of spending! Even today I am thankful to the good friend who insisted on me following her on a trip, because that’s how I finally managed to break that wall.

You see, I was raised in an Eastern-European, middle-class family. As a child, I often saw my parents saving money for the ‘black days’ of their pension years (the time when one would not earn a salary and could potentially ‘start starving.’) As a result, I followed the same behavior once I started to make my own money.

So here’s what I’ve learned: I won’t spend my precious younger years saving everything for my retirement. Saving money is a form of self-care, and something I currently do. However, I know I won’t die with my savings account, and I don’t want to look back on my life with regrets once I’m older. I invest in myself and in my learning, and I spend part of my money on experiences, making sure I gather more precious memories than material things.

You will never regret what you do in life. You will only regret what you don’t do. ~ Wayne Dyer

4. Do What You Love And Love What You do

We spend the majority of our lives at work. So if we’re not happy with our jobs, we’re not happy with most of life — another reason some of us start rat-racing and hoping for something different.

Too many people live their precious lives in survival mode, like robots. Frustrated or drained on Monday mornings and looking forward to the weekends, so that they can feel alive. When we’re happy with our work, there’s nothing wrong with Monday mornings.

Do work that you loveDo work that you love, or at least savor the parts you do find joyful.

If you find yourself stuck in a job you don’t like, know that you always have a choice to step outside your comfort zone and work toward something new. It may not be easy to change careers, especially if you have limited education and people depending on you. But it’s possible to do something you believe in; something that brings you genuine joy and fulfillment.

The key is to work toward that something new, while also cultivating joy in your daily life so you don’t fall into the trap of waiting for the future to be happy; and also, to remind yourself that no matter what happens, even if your circumstances are never ideal, you can still be happy.

The most important two days in your life are the day you were born and the day you find out why. ~ Mark Twain

5. Stay Away from Perfection

To me, being a rat-racer felt exhausting. I didn’t know how to have fun and relax. I was too busy trying to be perfect and do everything perfectly. It was tiring, and it made me feel like I was never good enough or worthy of the best things life had to offer.

Even when I transitioned into the job of my dreams, I was still unhappy. I kept thinking:

“The day I get to make that much money a month, I will be happy.”

“The day I know everything about this job, I will be happy.”

What is everything already IS perfect?Striving for perfection leaves us forever wanting more, wanting better.

You see, even people who love what they do can be rat-racers, if they are struggling with the need for perfection.

Today, I aim for progress instead of perfection, and I enjoy each step of my professional journey, celebrating every new lesson and every kind of achievement, no matter how big or small.

If you look for perfection, you’ll never feel content. ~ Lev Tolstoi

6. Mind Your Own Journey

Another thing that keeps us trapped in rat-racing is the behavior of comparing ourselves to others — the money we’re making, the status at work, the house we live in, and so on.

I now know everyone is on their own journey, and each time I dedicate moments of my life comparing, I find myself in someone else’s territory, not mine. It’s like trying to live in their story and life experience instead of my own.

Quit comparing!Remember – we each have our own journey, focus on creating happiness in your own!

I’ve come to understand that when I shift my focus and attention from other people to myself, I suddenly have more time and energy to create good things in my own life. So many people complain about not having enough time for themselves. If you want more time for yourself, mind your own business and see what happens.

Comparing yourself to others is an act of violence against your authentic self. ~ Iyanla Vanzant

7. Be Grateful

In the past, I rarely said thank you or counted my blessings. Today, I practice gratitude as a morning ritual. I focus on what I have, rather than on what’s missing.

I make sure I start every day being thankful for my health; for having a loving family, a wonderful life partner, and a great job I love; for the creativity flow that helps me write such posts and the opportunity to share my insights and experiences with the world; and for the air I breathe and the sun that caresses my face.

If the only prayer you ever say is Thank you, that will be enough. ~ Eckhart Tolle

I might not always get what I want, but I know I always get what I need. I see every day as a fresh start, a new opportunity for me to taste more of this juicy experience called living. Life is a precious gift and I intend to spend as much of it as happy as possible.

How do you feel about this article? Join the conversation.

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Words By Sara Fabian

Originally posted on tiny buddha, Simple wisdom for complex lives.

 

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