article
0

The Incredible Impact of Kindness on Humanity

By Azriel ReShel on Monday December 10th, 2018

Love in Action

Every day somewhere in the world, an innocent child dies from starvation, a family is threatened by war or disaster and flees their home with their pets and children to find refuge, a mother becomes ill from polluted water, a small boy shelters under a bridge in the snow, and a grandma in the remote mountains dies from lack of medical expertise.

In fact, every second, one person somewhere on the planet, dies from starvation. It is estimated that one in every six people don’t get enough food to eat and this year 36 million people and children will die from hunger. The UNHCR, the United Nations Refugee Agency says there are 68.5 million people displaced worldwide. Of these 25.5 million are refugees. And each day, 44,400 people flee their homes due to conflict and persecution.

While these figures are breathtaking in their enormity, these are the lives of ordinary people, just like you and I. People who want to live a peaceful, happy life with their families. We all want the same things, to love, be loved, to care for our families, to work and to play. Yet, every day an unbelievable amount of people die from a lack of the most basic human needs so many of us take absolutely for granted. On this 70th celebration of Human Rights Day, we can reflect on how we can each dig deeper into our hearts and stand up to make a bigger difference in the world. It is a day to recommit ourselves to protecting the safety and fundamental human rights of all people.

The Small Things Add Up

Instead of becoming hopeless and depressed about the sheer enormity of the plight of so many, we must instead focus on what we can do. Because in fact we can do so much and even helping one family or one child is a fantastic difference. If 7.2 billion people all did something to help each other, that adds up to something extraordinary.

If you think you are too small to make a difference, try sleeping with a mosquito. – His Holiness the Dalai Lama

Love in actionIf you feel compelled to help someone in some way, do it!

Each one of us has the capacity and power to make a change. And when we are fuelled by kindness and a heartfelt desire to help our brothers and sisters, anything is possible. Most people, given the chance, want to help and do good in the world. They just don’t know how to go about it. Yet, kindness can underline our parenting, our relationships, our work, and our daily interactions.

Every day we can align with our hearts, and take a small step to support world peace, by reaching out into our community, sharing ourselves and our skills or resources and helping just one person. This simple act of kindness will grow and ripple out further than we can imagine.

The Ripple Effect of Kindness

All over the world, people are answering the call of kindness. You can too. Ordinary people are setting up amazing charities, like backpacker Maggie Doyne, the then 19-year-old who was moved to save one street urchin in Nepal. She used her life savings to buy land so she could build an orphanage which now houses over 50 children. Ten years later, she has made an enormous impact on the lives of so many children, altering their future forever. Or yoga teacher Atira Tan, who found a passion within her to save the thousands of children and women who are victims of the sex trade in Nepal. Her choice to make a difference has saved and rehabilitated hundreds of women, who she now trains and employs as part of her charity Art 2 Healing to be able to support other women and children who have been enslaved by sex traffickers.

Each one of us can do something, even if it’s the simple act of sponsoring a child or donating regularly to a charity. Many hands coming together change the world. Spiritual teacher Andrew Harvey implores us in his incredible book, The Hope, to respond to global challenges with the transforming power of love and compassion.

It all adds upEven the smallest of gestures can have a profound impact and a knock-on effect.

Strengthened by prayer, practice and inspiration, turn now to your life and the people in it. Everyone, especially in a time like ours, has friends who are in grief, or ill, or looking for a job, or are in real financial difficulty. Commit now to ringing one of them up, and ask him or her what you could do to make their burden easier. Do this soon and be happy that you can.

When we fill our hearts with the gratitude for the gifts in our own life, we have the fuel to support others. Andrew Harvey shares the importance of a commitment to spiritual practice in keeping our hearts inspired with love and wisdom and aligned with the ‘”pure deep love” that is longing to use us as its instrument in the world.

Make a commitment today, even if you are in financial difficulties, to tithe between five and ten percent of what you earn to a cause of your choice. I recommend choosing one particular cause that deeply moves you and sticking to your commitment, whatever happens; over time, tithing like this will give you a great and healing sense of being of use and the cause you are helping will become more and more precious and personal to you, and you will want, naturally and simply, to do more.

Standing Up for Human Rights

This year’s Human Rights Day advocates for everyone to stand up for their rights and those of others–civil, economic, political and cultural rights. Additionally, the day aims to enlighten us about how our rights are a foundation of sustainable development and peaceful societies. The 2018 commemoration of Human Rights Day marks the beginning of a year-long celebration of 70 years since the international community adopted the declaration. We celebrate all our inalienable rights and freedoms, including a right to education, a decent living, health care and a right to live free from any form of discrimination among others.

Let’s build a beautiful world for all, where all children feel safe, everyone has enough to eat and communities are strong and united.

Azriel ReShel

Writer, Editor, Yoga Teacher & Healing Facilitator

 

Related

UnexpectedKindnessChangeLifeFEATURE

How an Unexpected Kindness Can Change a Life

10RulesBeingHuman-readingbook

10 Rules for Being Human

Subscribe to UPLIFT

UPLIFT is dedicated to telling the new story of inspired co-creation.

Get free updates and news about UPLIFT events and films.

How will my data be used?

references

comments

6 Responses to The Incredible Impact of Kindness on Humanity

  1. Fantastic call to arms Azriel. We can do so much by helping those around us and if we are in a position to, help those further afield. We are all connected. All important. There’s an artificial feeling of separateness that has been created because of the boundaries of countries. These boundaries are arbitrary and they are not real in the first place. We are all flesh and blood and the same. We can look on each other, despite our apparent physical and cultural differences, as brothers and sisters because as you point out we all want the same in life. ❤️

  2. Thanks Azriel, for writing this. Everything of yours I’ve read has been a real inspiration to me. I’m in a shitty spot in my life right now to be honest. My life has been plagued by worries for weeks. And the only solution I’ve come up with to my ails is postponement and kratom and cigarettes; the physical addictions I have, and distraction with TV and wasting time. I’ve neglected that which I cannot see, taste, touch, or feel. I’ve neglected my spirit, and you know, I’ve become numb. This right here is real, it’s not fake, it’s not mara. I’ve seen these things, but ignored them. I may sound crazy, but damn near every day, you know what I see. 11:11 on the clock. You can explain it away all you want, but it’s a calling, the sacred numbers, it’s an angel calling out to me to change my path. And you know, this article about just giving back. Not just taking, taking, taking. I know that I have abilities as do all other people, that I can use to help people, and this article and the signs I’ve seen have inspired me to look ahead of the past, to rewrite my story, to, right now, change my path, not for my gain, but for the gain of those who are struggling, like I am. I’ve been to the darkest depths, I’ve walked in the shadow of the valley of death, but right now, right now, not late. I will my make a change. I will be grateful. I am grateful for all my blessings, for food, shelter, my comfortable life, this article, my family, the fact that I breathe right now. The fact that I had the beautiful opportunity to read this article, to let my spirit shine, to tell you all what is inside of me, and that it’s alright, everybody can make a change. Use everything you’ve got. Thank you so much.

    • Hi Tyler, thank you for your heartfelt message. You can make a difference and sounds like you have experienced some dark times, which gives you empathy and the ability to hold space for others. Don’t give up, you will find your way, all it takes is the intention to do just that and you will be guided and supported. Wishing you all the very best.

  3. I initiated in India where I live now in 2009 the project ” Each One Takes Care of One” The Easiest Way to recreate the original Oneness. My aim was to develop a Culture of Care in a very practical level, to inspire people to develop the awareness of the relationship of interdependence that we have with the whole of humanity, nature and the entire cosmos and to transform the consciousness that “the other” is a stranger into a vision, awareness and feelings that we all belong to a global, universal, family. And the results speak for themselves now.

  4. Vasudhaiv Kutumbakam is the Sanskrit saying that means the entire world is one family. ReShel, your article echoes these wise words of an ancient yore. Yes, we must be kind and do some charity… not necessarily, in terms of money or goods only. It may be selfless service also.
    I share a real example. We are Hindus. My brother in law was in Saudi when he suffered a head injury. He was operated upon by a Muslim doctor from the Middle East. My sister was helped by an Indian Muslim man in the Indian Embassy who told her that he had to repay the kindness of her brother, that was me! I, as a policeman, had once helped him in the course of my duty, without ever knowing that one day he would come to our rescue from a crisis. And I do not even know his name!

Leave a reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.